Friday, December 5, 2014

Good Story 097: In This House of Brede


Let's face it. Reading In This House of Brede by Rumer Godden is the closest either Julie or Scott will come to being cloistered nuns. Episode 97!

Download or listen via this link: |Episode #097|

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LINKS

- Forgotten Classics: China Court by Rumer Godden

- Jo Walton's review of In This House of Brede

The Benedictines of Mary, Queen of Apostles:



10 comments:

  1. Thank you for a wonderful conversation about one of my all time favourites. I was really struck by the idea that a religious community was a family. Once you're in, you're in. We all have our drunk uncles and black sheep and Sister Veronicas. I loved that concept and it drew me the religious life (although God - and my husband - had other plans).

    Abbess Hester is based on Dame Laurentia McLachlan of Stanbrook Abbey (which was the basis for Brede). Stanbrook is still around, although they have moved to a smaller abbey. The next time you flip through a hymnal, note how many older hymns come from the Stanbrook Hymnal or were translated by a Sr. with OSB after her name. With their charism to sing the liturgy they nurtured some serious academic translators and musicians.

    I don't know any priest (or brother) books -- but Scott might enjoy watching the movie Into Great Silence for the year of consecrated life. It's all about the Carthusians. Another good read - enclosed sisters again, but American Poor Clares, and fact, not fiction, is A Right to Be Merry, by Mother Mary Francis, PCC (or Sister Mary Francis, PCC if you find an old second hand edition).

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    1. I'm going to look for that book! Thank you Meg!

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    2. I LOVE Into Great Silence - thanks for mentioning it, Meg. I watch it every so often. You remind me that I loaned that out...

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    3. A Right To Be Merry is a terrific book.

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  2. So love this book and the author. One of those books that seem so true to life where nothing takes you out of it. Many books you can have a sense of story telling and other artifacts of writing. This one seemed more like life than a story for me.

    I remember when I first read "Story of a Soul" and was surprised by the atmosphere in the convent. It is easy to idealize convent life as if on their taking of vows all concupiscence is

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    1. I agree it seems true to life. I'd read it several times before reading Story of a Soul. I might have been the only one of our book club not surprised by St. Therese's struggles with the pencil-tapping sister. I'd been primed by Brede. :-)

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  3. I'm finally going to have to read "Story of a Soul!"

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    1. I tried it twice on my own before being forced to read the entire thing by my book club. I found the last half of it riveting and St. Therese still speaks to me via the stories she told of her consecrated life. The first half - not so much. But your milage may vary. :-)

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  4. Rumer Godden not only converted after researching and writing Brede, she became a Benedictine Oblate.

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